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blacksheep

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The Obsession With Winning
« on: March 23, 2017, 11:09:34 AM »

The absolute WORST THING about soccer in this state (I don't know if it extends throughout the country) is the obsession with winning at a young age.  I tell my son, "who cares about winning?" if they should lose a game "that's your coaches problem, your job is to have as close to a perfect game as possible AT YOUR POSITION."  He has a great coach, who does not stress winning.  But he's had coaches who send out emails after games and yelling on the sidelines (seen that from almost every coach we've played).  It really sucks. 

The parents are certainly a problem.  If the coach loses a couple of games they start grumbling.  And with the various academies it's just winning, winning, winning and that means stress upon running, shooting, running, passing, shooting.  Nothing it seems for the individual skills that are needed for players to get noticed by real clubs in the future.  So you tend to have a great number of athletic work horse players running, running, running ... but what real club wants players like this?  No finesse, no poetry.  Just running. 

I am sure winning does matter in other parts of the world, but it just seems like athleticism and work rate is favored in this state or country at the expense of actual technical skill.  It's like we're in England twenty years ago which unfortunately is where a lot of club soccer seems to be stuck despite the best efforts of WYS to change that.   
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bubbasaurus

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2017, 11:50:51 AM »

How do you think that WYS is trying to change the emphasis on winning? Just curious, because that's not what I'm seeing as a parent and as a coach.

I agree that there needs to be a culture change in the younger age groups about development over winning. But in our current culture where parents are paying $2500 a year for their DK to play on a premier club's X, Y, or Z team, I don't see that the people writing the checks really want to see things change.
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2017, 11:53:12 AM »

Well that rule that players have to stand 30 yards or whatever from the goal so that the goalkeeper can pass to defenders to build from the back.  That's a great innovation.  The only reason that rule was instituted was to kill British style 'hoofing of the ball' up field. 
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2017, 12:00:27 PM »

I don't see that the people writing the checks really want to see things change.

Yes and I've slowly come to realize that it's the parents who are the problem in this state or perhaps even in this country.  The kids actually learn quite a bit about how football is supposed to be played from Youtube.  Some coaches actually put the effort to make their players play more imaginative.  It's the parents who are congratulating their kids for 'booting the ball' from the back and wondering why the coach just sat their kid for doing that. 

It's the soccer culture in this region or even this country that's the problem.  I tell my son over and over again, it's all about poetry. And he's like 'what's poetry?'  I am at a loss of words to explain poetry so I say 'you know like rap' which destroys my next explanation that it is about making things beautiful.  'Rappers don't make things beautiful, they can't even speak English properly.'  He's obviously learned too much from me. 

I don't even know what the proper analogy is any more given that we live in such a debased society.  I guess after watching La La Land perfect soccer is like being in love.  Everything just clicks.  People are doing what they are supposed to be doing and it just seems effortless.  In a strange way, like being in love it almost can't work out every time.  I guess I should quit while I am ahead. 
« Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 12:06:30 PM by blacksheep »
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bubbasaurus

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2017, 12:10:26 PM »

Well that rule that players have to stand 30 yards or whatever from the goal so that the goalkeeper can pass to defenders to build from the back.  That's a great innovation.  The only reason that rule was instituted was to kill British style 'hoofing of the ball' up field.
That didn't come from WYS, the mandate came from USYS. A few associations locally had started using it before the USYS mandate, but it wasn't implemented first by WYS. It really came about because most of the U8-10 kids can barely get a goal kick out of the box and it's not good seeing a keeper having the ball blasted back at them from 4 yards away. If they could kick the ball up to the middle of the field, I don't think the rule would have happened.
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2017, 12:19:27 PM »

It really came about because most of the U8-10 kids can barely get a goal kick out of the box and it's not good seeing a keeper having the ball blasted back at them from 4 yards away.

Are we sure about that?  I mean the effect at least has been to help play build out of the back.  Surely that was the intention, no?  Well I was trying to be positive at least.  If it's true what you're saying things REALLY REALLY SUCK around here. 
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Tacoma Soccer Dad

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2017, 12:48:04 PM »

I think blacksheep and bubba are both right about the hold line.  At U9/10 and below, goal kicks were a disadvantage.  When a ball crossed my kids end line, I always hoped it would be ruled a corner kick.  The rule stops the goal kick feeding frenzy and encourages possession.  Both are good for development.

Regarding winning, I guess I should appreciate the team my kid plays for.  They are not winning many games, but the parents are very excited about their development.  During most games us parents are talking about how it's the best game they've played (even though the lost 2-1).  They are really starting to play soccer!  Connecting passes, communicating, trying out moves, etc.  Sure we have a little more fun when they win, but I'd much rather see them grow as individuals and a team. 

A prior remark attributed some of the pressure on money.  That's probably part of it.  I am only paying about $1,000/year for my kid to get comparable coaching to much more expensive clubs, and we don't have to travel much.  It's easier to relax when your child is learning a lot, developing, having fun, and your aren't paying an arm and a leg.
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Turner b1kr

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2017, 12:55:13 PM »

TP is going engage in some serious smack down on this thread.
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ForTheKids

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2017, 01:40:04 PM »

As my kids have aged through, I've come to conclude the education of the parents is the only way to change it. Unfortunately, while that can be done on a small scale, actually with smaller clubs where teams stay intact, trying to educate parents on a larger scale has proven to be daunting.  So, either educate the parents or make the premier and elite game free cause free changes things alot.

Tom Byer is an intelligent teacher of the game. He brought the game to Japan and then to China, both of which are doing quite well. He is worth following on twitter and learning from ... for those that are inclined. Tom-san believes without parent educate, the rest is meaningless.

https://twitter.com/tomsan106



You can get the book here and read a bit about the philosophy:
http://www.tomsan-shop.com/product/7

https://www.amazon.com/Tom-Byers-Football-Starts-Home-ebook/dp/B01EHK4US6

Parents, you own the process until your kids can own it. Assume the club is not going to take your kid where they need to go and come up with a plan to mitigate that reality.

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merenguemom

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2017, 01:48:13 PM »

Quote
I tell my son over and over again, it's all about poetry. And he's like 'what's poetry?'  I am at a loss of words to explain poetry so I say 'you know like rap' which destroys my next explanation that it is about making things beautiful.  'Rappers don't make things beautiful, they can't even speak English properly.'  He's obviously learned too much from me.

The analogy you are looking for is Jazz. Improvisation within a structure.  Rap is essentially the same, just with a focus on words instead of notes.  I am sure early critics of jazz complained that the saxophonist couldn't play his instrument "properly" the first time they heard a long soulful moan instead of the crisp notes of Sousa.  Both come from the streets, from the city, from oppression.  You aren't going to find it on the pay to play fields, but you can  find it here: https://www.instagram.com/p/BPq4zmoFein/?taken-by=dial_square_soccer  #streetsoccer
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silverdad

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2017, 01:58:21 PM »

Unfortunately, our coaches and talent evaluators need to be educated first.  As has been described above, most of these individuals in positions of authority within WYS seem to prioritize physical traits over skill and competitiveness, which is very short-sighted when you are talking about kids in the younger age groups.  Most of these individuals are so ingrained in their way of thinking that they either don't want to learn something new or think they don't need to.

Notice I said skill and competitiveness.  You cannot ignore the latter.  I see plenty of kids with strong ball skill that don't make a difference in actual games because they don't have grit, competitive spirit, etc.  If a player has these qualities but is small, you can project that the player might have a chance to grow and develop the physical side - or alternatively with enough skill and competitiveness, the physical traits may not even matter as much. 

So, tying this back to this thread, winning is still important.  But it isn't the only thing, nor should it be the first priority, at the younger age groups.  I don't give a rip about my kid winning a game by intercepting a goal kick and converting that for a goal, or by intercepting a bad giveaway by the defense, because I know these types of plays won't be repeatable against higher-level competition in the future.  My kid knows this as well.  We emphasize beautiful plays, hopefully rewarded by a goal but not defined purely by whether a goal was scored.  But, the desire to win, to outcompete, to come back when down, to drive hard at the end when tired - all of those are important traits too and cannot be disregarded.  This is why I think the USSDA structure is an overcorrection - legislating winning out of the equation isn't going to fix things.
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2017, 02:19:02 PM »

Another example.  When the kids scrimmage in practice the kids naturally keep score.  'I scored the winning goal.'  'I didn't score the winning goal.'  I get that this is only natural and I don't think the clubs encourage the score keeping.  But I think clubs should reward creativity.  I think it's where you put the emphasis.  It's always going to be about winning in a sense.  It's dissatisfying to lose.  But the enemy is players not willing to take chances owing to the fact they might 'fail.'  I used to tell my son that he should 'fail spectacularly' in games which didn't work at all. 'Fail spectacularly ..." he would look at me a horrified look, "why would I want to make a spectacle of my failings??"

I have often toyed with the idea of banning parents from games.  Let them watch the video highlights later or something.  Have chairs away from the game and maybe some coffee and let kids be kids.  But I am always amazed at how the games start off quiet and then in a tie game how all the shouts start emerging.  Even I have a hard time controlling myself when everyone else starts doing it. 'Harder to the ball!' 'That was your ball!' etc etc.  Lock the parents up in a cage for an hour or tell them to go away. 
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Dennis Birdcamp

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2017, 04:21:41 PM »

merenguemom is correct. Stu Thornton is the best coach in Seattle.
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tripleplay

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2017, 06:53:16 PM »

People who think there is obsession with winning in youth soccer obviously have no experience with other sports in this country, nor experience with soccer in other countries.

I rarely see it -  the newbie parent or coach gets a little over-excited. Been there. The vast majority have a very balanced attitude. Of course, if kids themselves don't care about winning, they shouldn't be playing, and probably won't be for long.
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tripleplay

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2017, 07:00:40 PM »


That didn't come from WYS, the mandate came from USYS. A few associations locally had started using it before the USYS mandate, but it wasn't implemented first by WYS. It really came about because most of the U8-10 kids can barely get a goal kick out of the box and it's not good seeing a keeper having the ball blasted back at them from 4 yards away. If they could kick the ball up to the middle of the field, I don't think the rule would have happened.
Of course, it is illegal to play the ball before it leaves the goal box. I have no particular problem with these rules, but I would hardly call them a great innovation. At the very youngest ages they make some sense. At somewhat older ages, you are basically sending a message to kids that instead of learning to think and act for themselves, the parents will come in and make things nice and easy for you. But how do the parents follow that up during WC qualifying?

By the way, I have never seen a youth level where mistakes on goal kicks don't lead to opponents' goals. Premier A High School ages, for example. Eventually the players will have to learn to think, why delay that moment?
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merenguemom

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2017, 11:36:41 PM »

@Dennis Birdcamp - I agree, but my point wasn't to rep a particular coach, rather encourage @blacksheep to look outside club soccer if he wants his kid to play creatively and be comfortable with failing spectacularly.  Those skills are learned in pick-up/freeplay conditions, not regimented training. 

"Everything I have achieved in football is due to playing football in the streets with my friends"
Zinedine Zidane
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All for One

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2017, 08:10:30 AM »

People who think there is obsession with winning in youth soccer obviously have no experience with other sports in this country, nor experience with soccer in other countries.

I rarely see it -  the newbie parent or coach gets a little over-excited. Been there. The vast majority have a very balanced attitude. Of course, if kids themselves don't care about winning, they shouldn't be playing, and probably won't be for long.

I tend to agree that maybe the obsession with winning isn't the problem, or at least not the biggest problem. I grew up in Canada, playing hockey from the time I was 5 years old. Youth hockey in Canada was VERY competitive back then and it's even more so today. And yet Canada produces the best hockey players in the world.
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bebu

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2017, 09:43:02 AM »

Unfortunately, our coaches and talent evaluators need to be educated first.  As has been described above, most of these individuals in positions of authority within WYS seem to prioritize physical traits over skill and competitiveness, which is very short-sighted when you are talking about kids in the younger age groups.  Most of these individuals are so ingrained in their way of thinking that they either don't want to learn something new or think they don't need to.

Notice I said skill and competitiveness.  You cannot ignore the latter.  I see plenty of kids with strong ball skill that don't make a difference in actual games because they don't have grit, competitive spirit, etc.  If a player has these qualities but is small, you can project that the player might have a chance to grow and develop the physical side - or alternatively with enough skill and competitiveness, the physical traits may not even matter as much. 

So, tying this back to this thread, winning is still important.  But it isn't the only thing, nor should it be the first priority, at the younger age groups.  I don't give a rip about my kid winning a game by intercepting a goal kick and converting that for a goal, or by intercepting a bad giveaway by the defense, because I know these types of plays won't be repeatable against higher-level competition in the future.  My kid knows this as well.  We emphasize beautiful plays, hopefully rewarded by a goal but not defined purely by whether a goal was scored.  But, the desire to win, to out compete, to come back when down, to drive hard at the end when tired - all of those are important traits too and cannot be disregarded.  This is why I think the USSDA structure is an overcorrection - legislating winning out of the equation isn't going to fix things.


I tend to agree that maybe the obsession with winning isn't the problem, or at least not the biggest problem. I grew up in Canada, playing hockey from the time I was 5 years old. Youth hockey in Canada was VERY competitive back then and it's even more so today. And yet Canada produces the best hockey players in the world.

Agreed that being competitive by itself is a good trait in a player and in coaches. After all, sports is about competing.
There's a difference between "winning now, at all cost" and "trying to win now, but prioritizing the future".
When your priority is to win as much as possible right now, you have a different mindset in what to look for in a player, what to teach them in training, what tournaments to attend, how you play your team on game day and how do you use your bench... Many of these decisions have big impact to the future of the players and the future of the team.
A good coach with an eye for the future will know how to balance different priorities (winning, developing the player and the team, building confidence, teaching life skills...). A well educated parent will look past "win-lost" records and do more due diligence in picking the right environment for their kid. A level headed kid will know that he/she needs to keep working hard so that when the physical advantage is reduced, he/she can still be competitive.

Man United class of 92 remains one of the best crops of talent ever. There's a certain Paul Scholes who was small, slow, weak and couldn't play for more than 30 minutes a match because of asthma. If Man United coaches got rid of Paul Scholes when he was young because they wanted to "win now", we may not have seen one of the best center midfielders ever. 
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Tacoma Soccer Dad

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2017, 10:09:29 AM »


[/quote]
Of course, it is illegal to play the ball before it leaves the goal box. I have no particular problem with these rules, but I would hardly call them a great innovation. At the very youngest ages they make some sense. At somewhat older ages, you are basically sending a message to kids that instead of learning to think and act for themselves, the parents will come in and make things nice and easy for you. But how do the parents follow that up during WC qualifying?

By the way, I have never seen a youth level where mistakes on goal kicks don't lead to opponents' goals. Premier A High School ages, for example. Eventually the players will have to learn to think, why delay that moment?
[/quote]

TP:  I don't think you are familiar with the new rules for younger ages.  When taking a goal kick, the opposing team must stay behind a touch line.  I think they can't cross until the ball is recieved by the kicking team.  It is an innovation and it improves the development.
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #19 on: March 24, 2017, 10:12:37 AM »

If Man United coaches got rid of Paul Scholes when he was young because they wanted to "win now", we may not have seen one of the best center midfielders ever.

I understand the argument and the analogy and agree.  But can't we stop citing British examples?  It is the dependence on this crappy 'boot the ball and run after it bounce all over the field' tradition that is the real problem in this country.  If we had been the descendants of Italians or Brazilians we would - with our massive population - have won 6 World Cups by now.  I think this is also plays a role in the parents being so obtuse - they grew up watching crappy soccer and reinforce the same crappy ideals of British play. 

Let's all agree that we should toss a stick of dynamite into the British model and wipe it off the fact of the earth and then move on there is hope for America.  It's funny because I speak and understand German when I am going through YouTube looking for training videos it is interesting to see that there are a number of British and German videos from the 90s attempting to introduce 'Brazilian football skills' to the youth of those countries.  The difference of course was that only Germany actually transformed their entire system to incorporate that higher technical understanding of football into their game.  As a decrepit and delusional 'aristocracy' (how many times do we have to hear that they invented the game) England maintained their idiotic way of playing into the new century. 

Of course it helps that Germany was always superior to England in the 20 years leading up to the humiliation in the final at the hands of Ronaldo, Rivaldo and company.  But the Germans were honest enough to admit the old model wasn't working in the new age and the revenge in 2014 was a product of honesty and the integrity of the German national character.  The main reason why Brexit occurred for instance is simply because England is stuck in the past in more than just soccer and Germany is constant innovating reinvesting etc.  It's a fundamental difference between their cultures. 

Let me say one caveat - to be sure growing up in Canada as the son of German immigrants my hatred of all things British undoubtedly manifested itself owing to being exposed to the vestiges of colonialism.  I (half tongue in cheek) am considering starting a group which actively petitions UEFA to ban Premier league teams from participating in the Champions League, Europa League etc.  But all this not withstanding we should take every effort to purge similar vestiges of British soccer mentality from our culture.  Everything British sucks (except for Fish and Chips, decorum and the city of London) and Scholes was a very good midfielder but certainly not "one of the best center midfielders ever" unless that subset is allowed to contain the top 100 midfielders.  Otherwise your point is well taken. 
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 10:20:29 AM by blacksheep »
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2017, 10:22:52 AM »

Incidentally it just popped into my head just now.  Can anyone name one major British player who plays outside of England?  I was stumped.  And surely you can't say that this is because the EPL is so amazing.  There are Spanish players playing outside of Spain, Italian players playing outside of Italy, French players outside of France etc.  In fact Spanish, French, Italian and German players all play in Spain, France, Italy, Germany and even England now.  You couldn't say that about Germans a generation ago. There aren't even that many British players playing the EPL for God's sake.  WTF are all the British players playing?
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 10:31:14 AM by blacksheep »
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #21 on: March 24, 2017, 10:30:15 AM »

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bebu

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2017, 10:31:52 AM »

Sorry to poke your eyes when I refer to Paul Scholes. Your hatred for all thing British is distracting you from the main message.
I don't like dismissing any one nation or group of people plainly.
Let me pick a different example, a 13-year-old Messi or 12-year-old Andres Iniesta would not have been considered by any of the US teams.
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2017, 10:37:03 AM »

And just to make clear.  Under my recommendation throwing England out of European football would be CONCACAFs gain.  They have new planes that can apparently fly London to New York in 3 hours. At least British fans would know that they would qualify for the World Cup on a regular basis. 
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plentyofgames

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2017, 10:39:21 AM »

Incidentally it just popped into my head just now.  Can anyone name one major British player who plays outside of England?  I was stumped.  And surely you can't say that this is because the EPL is so amazing.  There are Spanish players playing outside of Spain, Italian players playing outside of Italy, French players outside of France etc.  In fact Spanish, French, Italian and German players all play in Spain, France, Italy, Germany and even England now.  You couldn't say that about Germans a generation ago. There aren't even that many British players playing the EPL for God's sake.  WTF are all the British players playing?

Gareth Bale. He's Welsh, but close enough. Joe Hart. The British players are playing in the Championship and below in the UK. Or in Scotland.
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2017, 10:39:49 AM »

Sorry to poke your eyes when I refer to Paul Scholes.

No I agree with you and said to in the post.  I thank you for bringing that up because it gave me the chance to say we should exterminate all vestiges of British soccer influences in this country.  That's an important point especially as it pertains to the expectations of parents. 

You don't know how many parents on my sons team think it's great to just boot the ball down the field.  You don't know how many of them don't understand that possession of the ball is de rigueur is the starting presumption of modern soccer.  Thanks again. 
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blacksheep

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2017, 10:41:36 AM »

Gareth Bale. He's Welsh, but close enough. Joe Hart. The British players are playing in the Championship and below in the UK. Or in Scotland.

OK Joe Hart.  He's cool http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/lukas-podolski-goal-joe-hart-germany-england-a7645526.html  But he plays at flipping Torino in Serie A middle of the table.  FC Torino is the 'B team' of Turin, like Espanyol in Barcelona.  But I guess that almost counts. 
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 10:53:41 AM by blacksheep »
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tripleplay

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2017, 12:35:14 PM »


TP:  I don't think you are familiar with the new rules for younger ages.  When taking a goal kick, the opposing team must stay behind a touch line.  I think they can't cross until the ball is recieved by the kicking team.  It is an innovation and it improves the development.
I am aware of these changes. However even before these changes it was illegal to play the ball before it left the goal box. So the argument that previously a defender could intercept the ball 4 yards from the goalie is nonsense.

I like the rule in U7 rec. But protecting kids from real soccer becomes idiotic at some point. You have a problem. Solve the problem ON THE FIELD. Don't whine to have Daddy solve it for you in a political meeting.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 12:42:13 PM by tripleplay »
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silverdad

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2017, 12:47:49 PM »


Of course, it is illegal to play the ball before it leaves the goal box. I have no particular problem with these rules, but I would hardly call them a great innovation. At the very youngest ages they make some sense. At somewhat older ages, you are basically sending a message to kids that instead of learning to think and act for themselves, the parents will come in and make things nice and easy for you. But how do the parents follow that up during WC qualifying?

By the way, I have never seen a youth level where mistakes on goal kicks don't lead to opponents' goals. Premier A High School ages, for example. Eventually the players will have to learn to think, why delay that moment?

TP:  I don't think you are familiar with the new rules for younger ages.  When taking a goal kick, the opposing team must stay behind a touch line.  I think they can't cross until the ball is recieved by the kicking team.  It is an innovation and it improves the development.
[/quote]
I am aware of these changes. However even before these changes it was illegal to play the ball before it left the goal box. So the argument that previously a defender could intercept the ball 4 yards from the goalie is nonsense.
[/quote]

TP, I am surprised that I or anyone else is bothering to address your latest gap in knowledge.  But here goes.  The prior poster is referencing a more recent change to the rules for the younger ages.  Under the traditional rule, a defending player kicks the ball, and NO player (offensive or defensive) may touch the ball before it leaves the penalty area (not the "goal box").  The new rule defines a line that is beyond the penalty area.  The defending player may pass the ball to another defending player behind this line.  The offensive player must stand behind the line until the ball is in play.  This encourages the team taking the kick to pass the ball to another defender (who can receive the ball without it being intercepted by an onrushing attacker) rather than just booting the ball up field.

See:  http://www.usyouthsoccer.org/assets/1/15/TheGoalkeeperAndLaw16.pdf
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tripleplay

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Re: The Obsession With Winning
« Reply #29 on: March 24, 2017, 12:48:28 PM »

Incidentally it just popped into my head just now.  Can anyone name one major British player who plays outside of England?  I was stumped.  And surely you can't say that this is because the EPL is so amazing.  There are Spanish players playing outside of Spain, Italian players playing outside of Italy, French players outside of France etc.  In fact Spanish, French, Italian and German players all play in Spain, France, Italy, Germany and even England now.  You couldn't say that about Germans a generation ago. There aren't even that many British players playing the EPL for God's sake.  WTF are all the British players playing?

British players will make more playing in the EPL than playing elsewhere, so why would they face bias and prejudice to make less money?

A similar logic is starting to apply to Americans and the MLS. Top players can make a good living here, so why go somewhere that the odds are stacked against you?
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