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Author Topic: Those two words: PLAYING TIME  (Read 999 times)

sounderfan

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Those two words: PLAYING TIME
« on: June 11, 2017, 10:32:58 AM »

The latest "Off the Pitch" column by Washington's own Ruth Nicholson...

https://goalwashington.wordpress.com/2017/06/11/off-the-pitch-playing-time-two-basic-questions-for-coaches-and-players/

One of the most dreaded conversations between players, coaches, and parents revolves around playing time. Nobody likes it.

In my workshops on conflict resolution for coaches and directors of coaching, I ask them to identify the most common types of difficult conversations and conflict they encounter. Consistently across the country, the number one answer is the conversation about playing time.


EWSoccer64

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Re: Those two words: PLAYING TIME
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2017, 01:05:56 AM »

The points about when to have the conversations I find particularly pertinent.   Avoid having particularly dangerous conversations in the vicinity of other players or parents, and before games or practices.  If after games or practices, ensure that they are away from others and when a proper period of reflection can be had before the next team function.
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Dazed and Confused

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Re: Those two words: PLAYING TIME
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2017, 12:35:21 PM »

I have a different slant on this.  In competitive soccer what is the minimum amount of playing time a player should expect?  I get and like the article, but to me it assume the cost model to play is reasonable and it is not $2K being spent to either barely or not play in the game.

I have had this conversation with parents on my son's team and others that I work with with kids playing club soccer.  If you want to truly develop kids you want a full roster at training, you want the kids and parents happy, and you want the best kids you can get top to bottom.  If playing time is strictly relegated to the top kids etc. what is the carrot to get the 14, 15, 16 player on the roster to pay a couple of thousand dollars to train on a club team?

Why would a high 8-12 pay US Club soccer money to be on team he/she will not set foot on the pitch or be out there very sparsely? And doesn't that hurt the team overall in the end?
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EWDOC

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Re: Those two words: PLAYING TIME
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2017, 09:35:44 AM »

It goes back to the old argument. What's more important, winning or development? If winning, best players will play. If development, all will play because if you believe in the old adage "The game is the greatest teacher.", then as a coach, you understand there are certain things a live game will help your players with that a training session can not. That's why some argue you don't create teams for the purpose of true competition until U14 or higher because to do it earlier, prevents too many players from getting the field time they need to grow as a player.

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dkbrandi87

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Re: Those two words: PLAYING TIME
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2017, 02:37:16 PM »

It goes back to the old argument. What's more important, winning or development? If winning, best players will play. If development, all will play because if you believe in the old adage "The game is the greatest teacher.", then as a coach, you understand there are certain things a live game will help your players with that a training session can not. That's why some argue you don't create teams for the purpose of true competition until U14 or higher because to do it earlier, prevents too many players from getting the field time they need to grow as a player.

^^This.  Unless you carry a roster with only 1-2 subs, "competitive" teams at younger ages aren't helpful to MOST of the players.
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ThiKuBC

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Re: Those two words: PLAYING TIME
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2017, 07:39:17 AM »

The latest "Off the Pitch" column by Washington's own Ruth Nicholson...

https://goalwashington.wordpress.com/2017/06/11/off-the-pitch-playing-time-two-basic-questions-for-coaches-and-players/

One of the most dreaded conversations between players, coaches, and parents revolves around playing time. Nobody likes it.

In my workshops on conflict resolution for coaches and directors of coaching, I ask them to identify the most common types of difficult conversations and conflict they encounter. Consistently across the country, the number one answer is the conversation about playing time.




avoiding most/all issues about playing time is actually very easy.

1. Remember that all the kids are there to play, and they were selected for the team because you determined they were good enough for that level of play - if it's learned that they aren't, make a squad change. Thus, if every player selected was deemed good enough, then they must play - a lot.
2. Before the season begins give your players and parents a document that outlines the team rules, and how breaking those rules affects playing time
3. Guarantee everyone 50% playing time if they follow the rules
4. Make the rules simple and clear.
5. Don't punish kids for attending school events, homework**, religious activities, family events etc with reduced playing time - but do tell them they don't get to start if they miss practice and other kids did attend practice. In those cases kid should still get 50% playing time. **homework - this may be a reason to reduce playing time depending on your team, age of player etc - older kids should never miss practice due to homework except maybe for state/national exam prep? even then, practice is just 1.5 hours so they should be able to schedule their time accordingly.

I've been following this, and now parents don't complain about my playing time - they complain to me about other coaches lol. Unless you are coaching a semi-pro team, every kid is amateur and thus should be playing - even Whitecaps academy gets every kid 50% playing time over the course of the season (barring injury).
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